Northwest Pennsylvania Adolescent Alcohol Research Cooperative (NPAARC)

The Northwest Pennsylvania Adolescent Alcohol Research Cooperative (NPAARC) is a grant funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).  NPAARC is a collaborative research project which includes members from the Pittsburgh Adolescent Alcohol Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh, Western Psychiatric Institute Clinic, and the Center for Rural Health Practice at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford and primary care providers (PCP) in an eight county area of rural Pennsylvania including McKean, Warren, Potter, Forest, Elk, Cameron, Clearfield, and Jefferson.  This project develops the research capacity of primary health care systems in rural northwestern Pennsylvania for addressing alcohol use and related problems in the age group of 12 to 20 year olds.  NPAARC has been building the cooperative’s research infrastructure through various projects, including:   

  1. A survey of area PCP’s on their alcohol-related practices and attitudes on underage drinking. 
  1. Focus groups of PCP’s, adolescents and parents further exploring adolescent alcohol use in area communities and factors affecting the use of screening and intervention tools in rural primary care practice. 
  1. The development and implementation of our Computer Assisted Decision Support for Underage Drinkers (CADSUD) in PCP offices, and evaluation of the influence of this decision support system on PCP assessment and referral practices and adolescent adherence to PCP recommendations over a one-month, two-month and one-year follow-up period. 

       4.  Twelve months of CADSUD maintenance support and utilization monitoring to determine the sustainability of the approach.

  

If you would like more information, please contact our Project Coordinator, Nickole Egger, at 814-362-5048 or nle3@pitt.edu.  

Some additional links and resources:

National Institutes of Health

 

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism  

 NIAAA Banner

 

The Cool Spot

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 Parents and students now have the opportunity to team up, have some fun, and learn a little something too! 

 Log on together and learn about the dangers of drinking too much or too soon, peer pressure "tricks," and

 effective ways to say "no" at The Cool Spot.  By logging on together, parents and kids can explore

 interactive games and tools to learn about and how to resist peer pressure to drink.  Want to email The

Send Cool Spot site to a friend?
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Make A Difference: Talk to your child about Alcohol

Ready to talk with your child about alcohol use?  Need some help?   

This guide is geared to parents and guardians of young people ages 10 to 14. Keep in mind that the suggestions on the following pages are just that—suggestions. Trust your instincts. Choose ideas you are comfortable with, and use your own style in carrying out the approaches you find useful. Your child looks to you for guidance and support in making life decisions—including the decision not to use alcohol.

“But my child isn’t drinking yet,” you may think. “Isn’t it a little early to be concerned about drinking?” Not at all. This is the age when some children begin experimenting with alcohol. Even if your child is not yet drinking alcohol, he or she may be receiving pressure to drink. Act now. Keeping quiet about how you feel about your child’s alcohol use may give him or her the impression that alcohol use is OK for kids.       

 -U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism-

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The Surgeon General's Call To Action To Prevent And Reduce Underage Drinking: A Guide to Action for Families

 Surgeon General

 

 

 

This guide gives you the knowledge and tools you need to take

action against underage drinking.  It tells you about underage

alcohol use and the damage it can do. And, it suggests ways

you can end underage drinking in your home, family, community,

and across the country. 

 

-U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Surgeon General, 2007-